Monday, April 29, 2019

Tarea: Morelia

Cherán exhibit at Centro Cultural Clavijero, Morelia
En Morelia, en una gran sala de Centro Cultural Clavijero hay un mural enorme de la cara de una anciana de Cherán, un pueblo único en el estado de Michoacán. Hace siete años, Cherán luchó contra los carteles y removió a todos politicos.  Las mujeres viejas lideraron la lucha. Es una historia muy interesante.

Calzada de San Diego
El Centro Cultural Clavijero es uno de los más de doscientos edificios construyeron en el siglo XVIII en la ciudad de Morelia. Es una ciudad limpiada y sofisticada con una gran plaza rodeada de portales llenos de restaurantes, hoteles, y música clásica y ópera. 

Mucha gente de todo México va a Morelia para Semana Santa. Las plazas estuvieron llenas con tiendas de comida, globos, y otras cosas para disfrutar. En la mañana siguiente a la celebración, todas las calles estuvieron completamente limpias.

Dos espectáculos de Jesucristo Superestrella se ofrecieron al  publico por gratis. Los cantadores y bailadores eran muy talentosos. Después de ese espectáculo, hubo un video mapeo a través del gran edificio. Las luces fueron muy creativas, coloridas y divertidas.

Origo está cerca el Templo de San Diego
Había muchos restaurantes maravillosos en Morelia. Uno de mis favoritos era Origo que tiene un menú de veintséis páginas! Lo que fue como una lección de español. También la comida era deliciosa y hermosa. 

Tal vez una de las cosas me gustó que más era en un otro restaurante, La Conspiración ... agua fresca de aguacate. Qué rico! 
Mi amiga Bette y yo nos quedamos en la Casona Rosa, que era muy bonita y hermosa. 





Comentarios de Juan Carlos:

Te envío algunas observaciones en cuanto a la pronunciación:

- Revisa la pronunciación de las palabras "Michoacán", "políticos", "lideraron", "siguiente" y "mapeo".

En cuanto a gramática:

- Revisa el uso de artículos unidos a preposiciones ("del", en "*sala de Centro Cultural").
 
- Revisa el uso de "que" para unir oraciones (*edificios construyeron en el siglo XVIII"; debería ser "que se construyeron"). Revisa lo anterior también en la siguiente frase: "*(...) una de las cosas me gustó que más era (...)".
 
- Revisa el uso del presente para describir hábitos y rutinas. Dices: "Las plazas estuvieron llenas con tiendas". Como estás describiendo Semana Santa, recomiendo usar el presente en vez del pretérito.
 
- Revisa que "un" y "otro" no se encuentren juntas en una oración (*"un otro restaurante" debería ser "otro restaurante").

En cuanto a vocabulario:

- Revisa acentos en "*politicos" (políticos)
- Revisa la diferencia entre "limpiada" y "limpia".
- Revisa el uso de "gratuitamente" (debería decir "se ofrecieron al público gratuitamente").

Hay, además, que revisar la puntuación (sobre todo, el uso de comas y signos iniciales de exclamación).

Challenge: 31 days to Conversational Spanish; Meta: 1000 Minutos

Goddess of the Lake

I’ve been studying Spanish fairly diligently for a year and a half … grammar, vocabulary, writing, reading, listening … everything except speaking anything except the most rudimentary phrases. I even created this blog to help support my learning process.

NOW, it is time to leap into the conversational fires. I’ve chosen the month of May to concentrate on speaking. After spending the past three weeks gathering my resources and materials to support this challenge, I was ready to begin when I decided I needed some outside advice from seemingly unrelated sources like Tarot cards and the wisdom of Rumi.

At morning coffee, my friend Cynthia and I drew cards for our projects. Mine was the High Priestess. I’m sure she’s here to guide me on more than just this Spanish challenge. The words related to the High Priestess according to  https://www.biddytarot.com are: Intuition, sacred knowledge, divine feminine, the subconscious mind. Not the first words that would come to mind for a language-learning project.
Reading the expanded guide gives me this:  the High Priestess is the guardian of the subconscious mind and the teacher of sacred knowledge and hidden mysteries.  She teaches you that the world is not always as it seems and more profound influences are often at play.
My takeaway on this is that this challenge might not be as much about powering through hundreds of verb conjugations and grammar rules as it is relaxing and following my intuition, allowing the right conversations to happen with the right people at the right time rather than force marching myself into a pre-conceived notion of what’s “right.”

To help me keep this intention, I’m going to draw a new Tarot card for each day of this challenge.

Rumi. When I drew a card from the incredible Card and Rumi Book Pack by Eryk Hanut and Michele Wetherbee, a warning card showed up. The first part of the message reads:

    Are you dazed
    from too much
    meat and wine?
    or are you 
    a soldier on
    the field of battle?

            The second part reads:    Look at what you are 
                                                 doing and decide if your
                                                 motives are selfish or brave.

Selfish - I really want to speak Spanish so I can talk with people who have a different culture, history, and world view than I do.   

Brave - I have to be brave to put myself out there to interact with people making my inadequate knowledge of Spanish completely visible as well as my limited perspective of their lives and challenges. 

I don’t feel like a soldier on a field of battle. However, it would be much easier just to be a reader of Spanish, maybe even a writer of Spanish, than to be such a beginner, such an incompetent, in a field where I’ve reached a relatively advanced stage in my own language. 

There is only one way to achieve my goal of speaking with the people of Mexico (at least the Spanish-speaking ones … there’s millions of people here who speak indigenous languages, but that’s another world all together), and that's to step into the void and begin speaking Spanish as much as possible every day. 

Living in Ajijic, which runs on English more than Spanish, makes finding native speakers to talk with not such an easy task. Almost everyone wants to speak English, so I also have to be creative and design interactions that will take me beyond basic greetings or ordering food in a restaurant.

I need to be brave as Rumi says and accepting as the Priestess advises. Simple, huh? 

Hunab Ku -- I wanted a charm for the challenge ... something that would remind me to keep going, bring me confidence and luck. I didn't know what it would be so I began wandering through stores. As I saw this hunab ku, I knew it was it. 

I came across the symbol a few years ago when I was writing a young adult fantasy set in the Mayan jungle, "Sarana's Gift... It changes everything."

The info I found at the time said the Hunab Ku was a Mayan symbol meaning the
balance and unity of all things with a further description as "the consciousness which organized all matter from a whirling disk - into stars, planets and solar systems. Hunab Ku is the Mother Womb which is constantly giving birth to new stars and it gave birth to our own Sun and planet Earth as well as the other planets found in our solar system."

Wikipedia now says it is an Aztec symbol meaning "the one god." Regardless, I like the symbol and the balance of light and dark. It helped me through one project so I choose it to help me through this one.

And,if you look closely, the Goddess of the Lake shown above is wearing the hunab ku.

My meta (goal) for the 31 days is 1,000 minutes of Spanish conversation with native Spanish speakers.





Sunday, April 28, 2019

Vocabulario: Los numeros de Español


Old door in Morelia
Even though you know numbers, when they are rattled off by vendors or in conversations, you may get lost if you haven’t done some specific listening practices. Here are some videos to help.

These videos give you several numbers. Write them down as you go. The video will then repeat the numbers or show them on the screen. The videos are shown in order of difficulty and provide excellent practice. 
 
I highly recommend practicing all of these until you recognize the spoken numbers easily.


Practice numbers in Spanish, dictation exercise - Tio Spanish - learn spanish videos

Bilingual Exchange - Spanish numbers practice

Test #1 Gateway to SpanishNumbers in Spanish: listening quiz 1

Note: After reviewing the first four videos, I took test #1 and missed 5 … mainly 5, 6, 7. 85% ;-(

Test #2 Gateway to SpanishNumbers in Spanish: listening quiz 2

Note: Test #2 was even bigger numbers and I missed 10 out of 20! 50% 
 
Plan: I'm going to repeat these videos and tests once a week until the numbers come easily ... and correctly!

Friday, April 26, 2019

Verbos: 130 Common, Regular Spanish Verbs, 3 of 3

Detail: Sanctuary of Guadalupe, Morelia
Regular verbs are beautiful things ... they play by the rules.

Once we know the conjugation patterns for each tense, we can use them in conversation without scrambling our brains. Here are 130 of the most common ones, presented with images for each verb because visual memory is powerful.

Also it turns out, we remember words best when they are presented together in a category such as regular verbs.

Learning process:

1. Say each word out loud. If you are uncertain about the pronunciation, check it at forvo.com.
2. Look at the picture closely and get a sense of what the word means. English is not used because that would teach translation instead of thinking in Spanish. If you're confused or uncertain, go to Google Translate.
3. Repeat the word out loud and try to use it in a simple sentence.
4. Review every 3 days until you are comfortable with all the words.


Verbos: 130 Common, Regular Spanish Verbs, 2 of 3

Semana Santa, Morelia, Michoacám
Regular verbs are beautiful things ... they play by the rules.

Once we know the conjugation patterns for each tense, we can use them in conversation without scrambling our brains. Here are 130 of the most common ones, presented with images for each verb because visual memory is powerful.

Also it turns out, we remember words best when they are presented together in a category such as regular verbs.

Learning process:

1. Say each word out loud. If you are uncertain about the pronunciation, check it at forvo.com.
2. Look at the picture closely and get a sense of what the word means. English is not used because that would teach translation instead of thinking in Spanish. If you're confused or uncertain, go to Google Translate.
3. Repeat the word out loud and try to use it in a simple sentence.
4. Review every 3 days until you are comfortable with all the words.